CANIS RECOVERY
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There are Mysteries we will Never Know-Perhaps should Never Know. Wolves carry some of these Mysteries. We are Drawn to Them- to their Howls, To the Site of Them, and to Their Tracks in the Snow......
One of the most serious problems faced by humane societies across North America is that of exotic pets. The lure of something different and the social need for status symbols has created a demand for exotic pets of all kinds, including wolves and wolfdogs (hybrids). Some even see these animals as tangible symbols of the wilderness, or have misplaced ideas about helping an endangered species by keeping one as a pet. And movies such as White Fang and Dances With Wolves have unwittingly stimulated interest in wolves as pets.


"a wolf can never be owned; it cannot be mastered......"
Because of the special needs and neurotic nature of these beautiful animals many pet wolves become unwanted and their owners decide to place them with a zoo "for their own good". Unfortuately, few zoos can accept such animals, for it is difficult to introduce them into established zoo packs. All too often, the animal ends it's short life being humanely euthanized, or being placed in a third rate zoo or game farm. In 1991, a Tennessee man was fined $1000 for trying to set his two captive raised wolves free in Glacier National Park. Such animals have little chance of survival in the wild.


WOLFDOGS (HYBRIDS)
According to the Humane Society of the USA (HSUS), there are over 250,000 wolfdogs (hybrids) kept as pets across the USA. Some of them by responsible owners that understand the behavior and nature of the wolfdog, and some of them by owners that don't realize what they have gotten themselves into until it is to late. A wolfdogs wild nature makes them resistive to training and confinement. Some new owners are not experianced and do not know what to expect. They become overwhelmmed and stressed. They just don't understand why their pet is not acting like a DOG. Unhappy owners of wolfdogs often have a difficult time disposing of their pets. Often the animal has bonded so strongly with it's owner that it cannot be successfully given or sold to a new owner. Animal shelters are flooded with wolfdogs, but many now refuse to accept them. As with pet wolves, many wolfdogs end their lives by being euthanized, a tragic result of the vanity of man


 

 

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